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Paati Vaithiyam : Fever

Rem­e­dy #1 * Take a glass of water in a ves­sel. * Add a few Tulasi (Holy Basil) leaves and 1 tea­spoon of pep­per pow­der. * Bring to a boil and allow the water to boil for some time. * Strain, add hon­ey and con­sume three times a day: in the morn­ing, after­noon and evening.

Rem­e­dy #2

* Take a glass of water in a ves­sel. * Take a fist­ful of Thuthu­ve­lai leaves (Climb­ing Brin­jal) and a cou­ple of Vetha­lai( Betel) leaves. * Tear them and add it to the water. * Bring to a boil and allow the water to boil for some time. * Strain, add hon­ey and con­sume three times a day: in the morn­ing, after­noon and evening.

Rem­e­dy #3

* Take a 2‑inch piece of dried Chitharathai (Less­er Galan­gal) rhi­zome. * Pound it using a mor­tar and pes­tle till it is bro­ken to small pieces. * Take a glass of water in a ves­sel and add the pound­ed Chitharathai rhi­zome to it. * Bring to a boil and allow the water to boil for some time. * Strain, add panam kalka­n­du (palm jag­gery) and con­sume three times a day: in the morn­ing, after­noon and in the evening.

How to grow Thuthu­valai (Climb­ing Brin­jal)

Thuthuvalai (Climbing Brinjal ) | Herb Tips

Thuthu­valai is used in Ayurve­da and Sid­dha sys­tem of med­i­cine. It is com­mon­ly used in the treat­ment of cough, cold, fever and asth­ma. Thuthu­valai can be plant­ed in dry land with min­i­mal rain­fall. Get some good seeds from an organ­ic store or from farm­ers and plant them in a pot. After the plants grows to a height of 30 cm, trans­plant those in your gar­den. The leaves have thorns and hence must be plucked care­ful­ly.

How to grow Chit­tarathai (Less­er Galan­gal)

SPS MARKETING Organics Chitharathai/Kulanjan/Lesser Galangal/Sitharathai/Herbals  Premium Organic Quality(50g) : Amazon.in: Health & Personal Care

Less­er Galan­gal grows well in trop­i­cal cli­mate and fer­tile red loams to forests soil are suit­able. Prop­a­ga­tion of Less­er Galan­gal is veg­e­ta­tive by plant­i­ng fresh­ly har­vest­ed rhi­zomes. Fresh­ly har­vest­ed rhi­zomes can be direct­ly plant­ed on the soil. Select rhi­zomes with at least two ger­mi­nat­ing buds (“eyes”). Dig a hole in your gar­den, plant the rhi­zome and cov­er the rhi­zome with soil. The soil should be well-drained but moist. Water to keep the soil moist, and apply organ­ic com­post once a month. Rhi­zomes can be har­vest­ed 18 months after plant­i­ng. Har­vest­ed rhi­zomes are cleaned, cut into pieces of 5 cm length and dried.

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